Archive Page 2

A Wish list for Axure

wish-listI’m in the midst of prototyping a virtual credit card terminal in Axure and some of my most fervent wishes are resurfacing, so rather than sit here and stew about it, I am going to put my wishes out there so perhaps Axure will hear them and do something about it? Don’t get me wrong–I love Axure and am so thankful to have it. It makes life so much easier. But man, if it could only …

Some of this might already be done in a newer version (that I don’t have yet), but gosh I wish it would do the following:

  1. Allow me to select a word or two and make them a hyperlink like real web pages do. It’s such a pain to have to put a box over the text I want to hyperlink. (Take some lessons from WordPress!)
  2. Make mouseover effects easily–like change the color of a table cell or some text when moused over to indicate its clickability. Right now to change the color of a table cell, I’d have to overlay a dynamic panel and try to align it perfectly with the table cell and manage the states by going to separate windows. And then when the table cell changes size or shape, I’d have to realign everything and change all the states and … it’s just too much work. I have a lot of pages to do and I’m in a hurry to get this prototype done.
  3. Put controls such as radio buttons and images IN a table cell like you can on a real web page. So if the table cell moves (like it tends to do when you’re wireframing), the control or image moves with it and you don’t have to go realign everything.
  4. Change the look of the buttons–and allow for a few different types of buttons.
  5. Use real cascading style sheets (CSS) like real HTML pages do, so I could import my style sheet and use the styles from my own CSS–and have them in the resulting prototype as real CSS styles. Wow that would be nice.
  6. Make cleaner, more usable HTML, so we don’t have to have someone go back and recreate the HTML page from scratch and end up with a different look and feel than the wireframe. (Using real CSS would sure help.)
  7. Not make a new image if I copy and paste an image from one spot to another. It’s the same image, folks! Why have a billion different images that look exactly the same? In fact, why not use an image library in a common images folder shared across pages (like, um, WordPress allows you to do) so if you want to use the same images on several pages, you can.
  8. Allow me to set an action for several elements at once. Say I want the user to be able to select a row in a table, for example. Right now I have to go to every cell in the table and set the action for that individual cell. If the table has a lot of columns, it takes quite a while just to set the actions for one row.

If you use Axure and agree with my suggestions, let Axure know or leave a comment here so that they know that it’s more than just one user’s wishes.

Advertisements

Back to Usability — how about a checklist?

download checklistOkay, enough sidetracking to Facebook, time to get back to usability.

There’s a very good 25 point web site usability checklist on usereffect.

Checklists won’t make your site usable–it’s best to usability test your site with the target audience and really sit back and watch what they have trouble with–but a checklist will help you avoid the most obvious mistakes so when you sit down to a usability test you’re not completely embarrassed that they can’t even tell what your web site is for.

11 things I learned from myFarm on Facebook

myfarm1I admit it, I’m hopelessly addicted to the myFarm game on Facebook. I myself call it a silly game, and yet I cannot keep away from it. I find myself stopping by myFarm several times a day. So to give myself (and the rest of you myFarm addicts) a little credit, I think there is some redeeming social value to be gleaned from myFarm-ing. (Other than by playing you are supporting a good cause.)

Here are a few things I learned (or re-learned) by playing this “silly” game that has become my virtual zen garden:

  1. Tending virtual plants and seeing them grow, flower, and produce fruit can feed your need for color through a dismal, cold, and very gray winter.
  2. The more you give, the more you receive and the richer you will become.
  3. Being rich with friendship is better than being rich with money.
  4. Know who the true farmers are in your circle of friends, and only send farm gifts to them. They are the ones who will appreciate them most—the others will see your gift as a nuisance.
  5. Sending gifts to someone who does not give back is like loving someone who only takes and never gives. It can drain you of energy. Give to all your farm friends, but give more to those who give back. As in friendship and love, a circle of positive energy feeds both souls.
  6. Sometimes the changes you make don’t take the first time. It’s okay. Just keep trying until it does.
  7. Savor the moment, and save the best for last. My favorite color is purple, so I save the plum trees to harvest last so I can savor the color of them for a few more moments. It’s a small thing, but life is so much sweeter when fed with small moments of joy.
  8. Tend to ALL the important things in your life. Escaping to the farm is good, but there is more to life than myFarm.
  9. Have patience. Do not be too hasty to act. Wait for the button before you click it.
  10. Beware of advertisers who wish to steal your attention away from your purpose.
  11. Watch your bank account, but don’t be fanatical about it.

Trackthis integrates package tracking into social networking

If you twitter or facebook and you order things that you have shipped to you, you’re gonna love this: TrackThis figured out how to take those hard-to-crack shipping APIs and let you track your packages via facebook or twitter.

I was all excited to try it, until I went to Facebook and discovered:

This application cannot be added to your Pages. Facebook applications for Pages can be specialized for certain Page categories (e.g. Restaurants or Bands). Either you have no Pages that fit the category of this application, or you have already added this application to your eligible Pages.

What kind of Facebook page do I need to be able to add it? That’s really confusing and is not making for a very good user experience. (Um, well, it’s denying me from even having a user experience! Hate that!) 

Well, maybe I’ll try it on Twitter.

Hey, I wonder if TrackThis would like to share some of their shipping API expertise with our comment-ers who are having difficulty integrating the buggers? See the comments on my shipping API post.

CVV and Conversion Rates

Yesterday on the Intellivative blog, there were two interesting blog posts:

  1. AVS & CVV: When to use it and why?
  2. Does CVV affect e-commerce conversion rates?

The second one is the most intriguing to me because it presents a quandary for e-commerce businesses.  CVV–that 3-digit code on the back of the credit card–is one of the recommended practices for fighting fraud; yet, if you use it on your e-commerce site, it appears that it might actually reduce the number of orders you may get from your site. The surprising mythbuster comes from the E-commerce Checkout Report from Get Elastic, which found:

Conversion rates were a full 40% higher where Top 100 retailers did not request a CVV (Card Verification Value), yet over 55% of them do.

The other interesting part about it was even though conversion rates were higher when the e-tailers didn’t use the card code, still over 55% of them still use it–which implies that either they didn’t know their conversion rate might be higher without it (did they try an A/B test on CVV code?) or that the fraud reduction benefits of the CVV code outweigh the potential higher conversion rate.

As a consumer, I think I would like it better if the site did ask for my CVV code–it shows they’re doing the due diligence to check for fraud which not only protects them, it helps me, the consumer. After all, if someone is out there trying to use my credit card (who wouldn’t have the CVV number), wouldn’t it be better if they were inhibited in their spending spree by web sites who do check the CVV code?

I always thank people who ask to see my ID with my credit card–they’re protecting me by doing that. Even though it’s a hassle for me to get out my ID and show it to them, I’d much rather they ask for it and make sure that I am the rightful owner of the card.

But apparently I’m an oddity. Either the CVV code is too complicated to find–or too much work to enter for many consumers shopping at the top 100 e-commerce web sites. Or maybe consumers just aren’t aware that the card code actually helps protect their identity and their credit card?

Thanks to Get Elastic for putting the work into this study and challenging our paradigms.

ProQuo: An easier way to get rid of junk mail

Several months ago, I found a site that claimed it would help reduce the amount of junk mail I get. I wasn’t sure it would work, but I thought I’d give it a try and see how things went. What I’ve noticed since I started this is that I get a lot less junk mail–between that and signing up for e-billing for all the bills I can, on some days we don’t have ANYTHING in the mail box. My goal is to get rid of all the unnecessary paper and junk that we get every day.

The problem with junk mail is we all get on a lot of lists. It takes a lot of vigilance to get your name removed from all those mailing lists (let alone to know what mailing lists you’re on!)

ProQuo helps you discover which lists you’re on and allows you to get off of most of them with just a click of a button. There are some lists where you have to go on another web site to opt out of their list, but wow does this simplify things. It’s not a one-time shot–you have to go back a few times and get off new mailing lists your name slipped onto, but it is awesome.

The site is organized very well with big buttons that are clearly labelled. You can make sure you still get the catalogs and mail that you want, and get off all the rest of the lists that you don’t want.

Check it out: http://www.proquo.com/

Gratitude on the iPhone

iPhone Gratitude AppHere’s a usable app for your iPhone or iPod touch–one that can bring positive energy and change to your life.  Happy Tapper makes gratitude journals even easier.

I was introduced to gratitude journaling a few months ago. The idea is to write down the positive things that happened to you that day–ending your day each day on a positive note. My daughter and I started doing this, using traditional paper journals, but sometimes we are running late and we don’t have enough time to write at night. If we had Happy Tapper, perhaps we could actually do our gratitude journals every day!

In this virtual gratitude journal, you enter five things you are grateful for each day, then rate the day. You can even add a picture if you want. Then the application gives you a little inspirational quote as a reward for doing your journaling. And you can change the look of it to suit your own tastes. That’s better than our static paper journals–and a whole lot faster!

I’m really impressed with the usability of this little gem. My 9-year-old daughter picked it up and figured it out right away.

Check it out at happytapper.com.